The following blogs were submitted by those students who could not attend the annual DAH institute (2015)…..

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Interconnecting the Semantic Web with the discipline of Philosophy

Ioanna Kyvernitou, first year DAH student in English at NUI Galway, surveys a range of knowledge representation technologies which allow effective linking among networks of data in the domain of Philosophy.

 What are the benefits of applying digital humanities techniques to Philosophy and how do these applications affect the discipline? How can knowledge representation technologies be used to organise data deriving from philosophical resources? In recent years, the rise of collaborative projects on the Web and the interdisciplinary work that has been accomplished between target domain scholars and computer scientists is significant in terms of disseminating and making accessible to Internet users digital resources. More specifically, by using technologies of the Semantic Web, semantically annotated and structured data can be shared, reused and processed automatically or manually, revealing possible new relationships among pieces of data.

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A Tale of Two Placements

Fourth-year DAH student at NUI Galway James Curry discusses two recent doctoral research placements in Dublin and Michigan and highlights the value of international scholarly and professional networks for the postgraduate student.

So far, during the course of my doctorate in history and digital humanities at the Moore Institute, NUI Galway, I have carried out two research placements. The first, carried out in September/October 2014, took place at the Dublin City Library & Archive, and saw me work under the helpful supervision of Dr. Máire Kennedy to create an online database of labour cartoons from the Lepracaun Cartoon Monthly journal concerning the great 1913-14 Dublin strike and lockout (Ireland’s most famous industrial dispute). This proved to be a very beneficial experience, and quickly led to me collaborating with Dr. Ciáran Wallace of Trinity College Dublin to produce a co-authored book in early 2015 entitled Thomas Fitzpatrick and the Lepracaun Cartoon Monthly 1905-1915.

It also helped persuade the University of Michigan Library, with whom I had been in contact since 2010, to agree to my request that I carry out a four week research placement at their institution. My agreed task was to begin the process of cataloguing a vast archive of research materials donated to the University of Michigan Library’s Joseph A. Labadie Collection by retired Albion-born historical researcher Virginia Hyvarinen. It was this archive, dealing mainly with the life and times of much-travelled radical journalist Jack Carney, which had been the initial catalyst for my contacting Julie Herrada, the Labadie Collection’s curator. I have long possessed an interest in Jack Carney, a neglected but influential radical figure who acted as a right-hand man to iconic Irish labour leader James Larkin in both America and Ireland from 1916 to 1936. And so, in April 2015, following the awarding of a travelling research grant from the Moore Institute and an Edward Weber endowment from the University of Michigan Library, I was delighted to visit America for the first time and carry out extensive research on Carney’s life and his network of other United States-based Irish or second-generation Irish radicals during the era of the infamous “Red Scare”.

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